The Strategy Paradox: Those who are paid to think strategically spend an average of just 90 seconds to 4.5 minutes per day doing so.

Regeneration cover
Rebecca Ryan, APF
Rebecca Ryan, APF

I wrote a book called ReGeneration. The premise is that America goes through seasons. Each season lasts 20–25 years and the complete cycle takes 80–100 years.

It felt like an important book to help Americans make sense of “winter” — the economic and social dumpster fire we were going through — and to remind us, “Hey, we’ve been in winter three other times. We can do this.”

But I made a mistake.

I wrote that our most recent winter started in 2001, with September 11. So we’d be “done” by 2020. I was wrong. Winter didn’t really start until the full blown economic collapse in 2009. This means that we won’t be “done” with winter until around 2030.

On one hand, this sucks. It means we may be mired in this partisan, divisive, dysfunctional ninnying for awhile. On the other hand, thank God. It means we have more time to restructure, to choose and elect different solutions and leaders that can help us rebuild a better future.

Here’s a free PDF of the original book without the cover. Just sub “2030” for “2020” and you’re all set.


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Rebecca Ryan, APF
Rebecca Ryan, APF

Rebecca Ryan captains the ship. Trained as a futurist and an economist, Rebecca helps clients see what's coming - as a keynote speaker, a Futures Lab facilitator, an author of books, blogs and articles, a client advisor, and the founder of Futurist Camp. Check out her blog or contact Lisa Loniello for more information.

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