The Future of Water

Osnos-Crisis-in-Flint-Goes-Deeper-Than-the-Water-690x485-1453318404

We need to talk about the future of water.

We need to talk about the future of water because we turn on our taps 71 times a day. We expect water to be there.

We need to talk about the future of water because 80% of our bodies are water, and by 2025 4 out of every 5 people in the world will live in water distressed areas.

Water doesn’t “belong” to a single municipality; water is a shared resource, a common good.

We need to talk about the future of water NOW, because when people get distressed, they don’t care about the commons. They become frightened survivalists.

NOW is the time to talk about the future of water. NOW, when we can still do something about it.

No one wants to be the next Flint.

Flint is the opposite of foresight. Flint happened because no one was looking forward. Some were looking up, towards their supervisors. Some were looking around, to see if anyone was watching. But no one was thinking about our kids and grandkids. (Well, one guy was, but he got punished for telling the truth.)

I want to talk about the future of water. How to prevent another Flint. How to ensure that we have one of life’s most basic elements safely available to our next generation. All of them.

If you want to join the conversation, register for our free, one-hour webcast taking place Tuesday, May 17 2016 from 3-4pm CST. We’ll talk about:

  • Infrastructure: what hardware and technology is going to be needed to secure water for future generations?
  • Collaboration: This is the sticky wicket: how do you get hundreds (and sometimes thousands) of stakeholders to agree on anything?
  • Best practices: Israel, Singapore and Milwaukee are kicking ass on these issues

PS Have a question or a resource to share? Email Stephanie, sr a[t] next generation consulting [dot] com.

Talk soon.

Topics in Blog